Are URLs and links the same thing?

Are URLs and links the same thing?

16.Nov.2021

When most people talk about URLs, they're usually talking about hyperlinks. Most commonly when people refer to a URL they mean a web address and so by extension a linked URL is an address that points to Web content. However, this isn't really correct because URLs can be used in many more ways than just pointing to web pages. For example, we might use the term URL in reference to an email message's link where clicking on it would open your mail client with a new message addressed to the person you clicked on. In other words, it’s not always clear whether someone means [a link](link) or [a URL](URL) .

In summary, links are one kind of URI , but not all URIs are links. The term "URL" is ambiguous and can refer to both a link or a stand alone URI, but URIs in general do not have to be links. [Note: This introduction is meant to use terms that can be understood by everyday people with a basic understanding of technology and its related concepts. If you need to do further research to understand the meaning of the terms found in this article, try starting with Wikipedia.]

A link can be described as a shorter version of a [full] [URL] . If you click on a link, it takes you to a [full] [URL] , but the link does not have to be the entire [full] [URL] or exactly the same as the URL. For instance, a link can just say “Click Here,” but “Click Here” is obviously not the [full] [URL] .

Some important points to note: Links can be a shorter version of a full URL. If you click on a link, it takes you to a URL , but this does not have to be the entire URL or exactly the same as the URL. For instance, a link can just say “Click Here,” but “Click Here” is not the URL . Links are one kind of URI (and they're similar to URLs), but not all URIs are links. The term "URL" is ambiguous and can refer to both a link or a stand-alone URI , but URIs in general are not links. [Note: This is an introduction meant to be understandable by everyday people with a basic understanding of technology and its related concepts. If you need to do further research to understand the meaning of the terms found in this article, try starting with Wikipedia.]

Links are one kind of URI (and they're similar to URLs), but not all URIs are links. The term "URL" is ambiguous and can refer to both a link or a stand-alone URI, but URIs in general do not have to be links. [Note: This introduction is meant to be understandable by everyday people with a basic understanding of technology and its related concepts. If you need further research to understand the meaning of the terms used in this article, Wikipedia is usually a good place for that.]

 

URLs are unique identifiers that stand for resources that are found on the Internet. A common example is a URL associated with a web page, but there are many other types of URLs, including those used to identify software services, email addresses, phone numbers and more.

The text of an article is not considered a resource because it cannot be referenced separately from the page on which it is found. It would only be a unique identifier for that specific article if it were published elsewhere, but since it's part of a page and not a stand-alone document, it does not have a unique web address.

For example, an email application may include a menu command to make a new message addressed to a particular person. This would be identified by a URL that only makes sense when used in conjunction with the application itself. However, such a command might actually just say "Click Here" rather than containing its own unique address.

URLs are not limited to just pointing to web pages, but they can also point to many other types of resources. For example, some browsers used to include a "View Source" command that would open the source of the currently loaded page in a new window or tab - this command would typically use an address that just says "View Source".

URLs are often confused with links because they both involve using text to identify something on the Internet , but URLs and links are not the same thing. [Note: This is an introduction meant to be understandable by everyday people with a basic understanding of technology and its related concepts. If you need further research to understand the meaning of the terms used in this article, Wikipedia is usually a good place for that.]

Links (also called hyperlinks) are references found in text to other web pages or resources. They are often blue and underlined, which lets you know that if you click on them, they will take you to a different page. For instance, words in a Wikipedia article might have an associated link to another article within the same site. This is just one example of how links are used though; they can also be found in web pages, documents or even emails.