Why did Google stop supporting Goo.gl? #matchurl

Why did Google stop supporting Goo.gl? #matchurl

09.Dec.2021

Google has announced that it is retiring its Goo.gl URL shortener service. The company made the change in response to how people use the internet, with a shift towards using mobile apps over desktop websites. Its new tool, Firebase Dynamic Links, is more flexible and lets site owners redirect users on mobile apps rather than just desktop websites.

 

Goo.gl was launched in 2009 as a way to make long website addresses shorter and easier to remember. It quickly became one of the most popular URL shorteners, with over 2 trillion links shortened using the service. However, its popularity may have contributed to its downfall, as many people started using Goo.gl simply because it was Google's shortener rather than because it offered any advantages over the competition.

 

Google's Firebase Dynamic Links (FDL) addresses many of Goo.gl's shortcomings, letting site owners redirect users on apps rather than just desktop websites. FDLs are more flexible and allow for dynamic tracking, making them easier to update as business goals change or traffic sources vary. They can also be used to create landing pages that send visitors down specific paths to generate marketing leads. Sites using FDL can also update links after they have been created, something that was impossible with Goo.gl without deleting the old link and starting over again from scratch. Overall, FDL is much better suited for modern internet marketing strategies which rely heavily on mobile app redirections rather than-based ones.

According to Google, Goo.gl will be completely retired by April 2019. Site owners who are still using the service are encouraged to switch over to FDL as soon as possible. Goo.gl URLs will continue to function until the retirement date, but they will not be supported by Google beyond that point. So if you're still using Goo.gl, now is the time to make the switch!

Google has announced that they are retiring their Goo.gl URL shortener service. The company made the change in response to how people use the internet, with a shift towards using mobile apps over desktop websites. Their new Firebase Dynamic Links tool is more flexible and lets site owners redirect users on mobile apps rather than just desktop websites.

Goo.gl was launched in 2009 as a way to make long website addresses shorter and easier to remember. It quickly became one of the most popular URL shorteners, with over 2 trillion links shortened using the service. However, its popularity may have contributed to its downfall, as it became a go-to for marketers due simply because it was from Google's camp rather than from any advantages over the competition.

Google's Firebase Dynamic Links (FDL) address many of Goo.gl's shortcomings, letting site owners redirect users on apps rather than just desktop websites. FDLs are more flexible and allow for dynamic tracking, making them easier to update as business goals change or traffic sources vary. They can also be used to create landing pages that send visitors down specific paths to generate marketing leads. Sites using FDL can update links after they have been created, something that was impossible with Goo.gl without deleting the old link and starting over again from scratch. All in all, FDL is much better suited for modern internet marketing strategies which rely heavily on mobile app redirections rather than website-based.

According to Google, Goo.gl will be completely retired by April 2019. Site owners who are still using the service are encouraged to switch over to FDL as soon as possible. Goo.gl URLs will continue to function until the retirement date, but they will not be supported by Google after that point. So if you're still using Goo.gl, now is the time to make the switch!

Sources:

 

https://www.cnet.com/news/google-retires-goo-gl-url-shortener-service/

https://firebase.google.com/docs/dynamic-links/quickstart/#urls_redirecting_users_between_apps_and_web_sites

 

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Google has announced that they are retiring their Goo.gl URL shortener service. The company made the change in response to how people use the internet, with a shift towards using mobile apps over desktop websites. Their new Firebase Dynamic Links tool is more flexible and lets site owners redirect users on mobile apps rather than just desktop websites.

Goo.gl was launched in 2009 as a way to make long website addresses shorter and easier to remember. It quickly became one of the most popular URL shorteners, with over 2 trillion links shortened using the service. However, its popularity may have contributed to its downfall, as it became a go-to for marketers simply because it was from Google's camp rather than from advantages over the competition.

Google's Firebase Dynamic Links (FDL) address many of Goo.gl's shortcomings, letting site owners redirect users on apps rather than just desktop websites. FDLs are more flexible and allow for dynamic tracking, making them easier to update as business goals change or traffic sources vary. They can also be used to create landing pages that send visitors down specific paths to generate marketing leads. Sites using FDL can update links after they have been created, something that was impossible with Goo.gl without deleting the old link and starting over again from scratch. All in all, FDL is much better suited for modern internet marketing strategies which rely heavily on mobile app redirections rather than website-based.

According to Google, Goo.gl will be completely retired by April 2019. Site owners who are still using the service are encouraged to switch over to FDL as soon as possible. Goo.gl URLs will continue to function until the retirement date, but they will not be supported by Google after that point. So if you're still using Goo.gl, now is the time to make the switch!

Sources: https://www.cnet.com/news/google-retires-goo-gl-url-shortener-service/

https://firebase.google.com/docs/dynamic-links/quickstart/#urls_redirecting_users_between_apps_and_web_sites [ARTICLE END] Why did Google stop supporting Goo.gl